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Make sure you’ve renewed your Youth Protection training – many leaders training expires this fall!

True youth protection can be achieved only through the focused commitment of everyone in Scouting. The BSA has adopted the following policies for the safety and well-being of its members. These policies primarily protect youth members; however, they also serve to protect adult leaders. All parents and caregivers should understand that our leaders are to abide by these safeguards. Parents and youth are strongly encouraged to use these safeguards outside the Scouting program.

Learn more about the BSA’s Youth Protection Program at: https://www.scouting.org/training/youth-protection/

Required Training

  • Youth Protection training is required for all BSA registered volunteers and is a joining requirement.
  • Youth Protection training must be taken every two years. For many volunteers, they may have last taken their Youth Protection Training in 2018, when the new youth protection training was rolled out — their youth protection will expire this year.  If a volunteer’s Youth Protection training record is not current at the time of recharter, the volunteer will not be re-registered.
  • Download the How-To Guide for taking Youth Protection Training

New to Scouting? Click here to login and take Youth Protection training. You do not have to be a registered member of the Boy Scouts of America to take Youth Protection training.

 

Frequently Asked Questions — for more FAQs, visit: https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/yp-faqs/

Q. How many leaders are required at Den, Pack, Patrol, Troop, or Crew meetings?

A. Two registered adult leaders 21 years of age or over are required at all Scouting activities, including meetings. There must be a registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over in every unit serving females. A registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over must be present for any activity involving female youth. Notwithstanding the minimum leader requirements, age- and program-appropriate supervision must always be provided.

All adults accompanying a Scouting unit who are present at the activity for 72 total hours or more must be registered as leaders. The 72 hours need not be consecutive.

One-on-one contact between adult leaders and youth members is prohibited both inside and outside of Scouting.

Q. Do Lion and Tiger Den meetings require two-deep leadership since adult partners are present?

A. Yes.  A Lion or Tiger adult partner is not considered a registered leader for meeting two-deep leadership requirements.  Lion or Tiger partners, as well as other pack leaders, provide a pool of adults who could be registered as an assistant den leader to meet this requirement.

Q.  If only one leader shows up, does that mean we have to cancel the meeting or activity? 

A. Yes.  This policy is in place to prevent abuse in and out of Scouting.   Adults should never be alone with youth who are not their children.

Q:  The Barriers to Abuse say that there must be two registered adults present for all Scouting activities and meetings.  Does that include merit badge counseling? Fund-raising events?

A. Yes. However, the parent or legal guardian of the Scout may serve as the second adult. This parent or legal guardian does not have to be a registered leader.

Q. The Barriers to Abuse states “One-on-one contact between adult leaders and youth members is prohibited both inside and outside of Scouting.” What does ‘inside and outside of Scouting’ mean?

A. The BSA has adopted its youth protection policies for the safety and well-being of its members. These policies primarily protect youth members; however, they also serve to protect adult leaders. All parents and caregivers should understand that our leaders are to abide by these safeguards. Registered leaders must follow these guidelines with all Scouting youth outside of Scouting activities. There are careers that may require one-on-one contact with youth, however aside from those roles, volunteers must abide by the youth protection policies of the BSA even outside of Scouting activities.

This policy is in place to prevent abuse in and out of Scouting.   Adults should never be alone with youth who are not their children.

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